Art Gallery

The full range of art in our gallery, please call us for more details

Feature Artist: Linda Syddick

Feature Artist: Linda Syddick

Linda Yunkata Syddick Napaltjarri (born c. 1937) is a Pintupi– and Pitjantjatjara– speaking Indigenous artist from Australia’s Western Desert region. Her father was killed by a revenge spearing party in accordance with customary Law when Linda was about eighteen months old; her mother later married Shorty Lungkarta Tjungarrayi, an artist whose work was a significant influence on Linda’s painting. Until the age of nine, Linda was raised in the traditional nomadic fashion, after which her family walked out of the desert to settle at the Lutheran Mission at Haasts Bluff...

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Feature Artist – Barbara Reid

Feature Artist – Barbara Reid

Barbara Reid Napangardi was born in 1962 near Tjukurla, Western Australia. She is the daughter of famous Australian National Gallery Artist, Ningura Napurulla and paints important women’s dreamings. Her paintings vividly depict a ceremonial site near Tjukurla where she was born and raised. Barbara’s use of bright colours is one of her trademarks coupled with thickly layered paint, typical of the Kintore region. Her style is an excellent example of the multivalent nature of Aboriginal paintings, that is, that the designs used in the paintings often have a number of interrelated symbolic...

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Feature Artist: Stan Brumby

  Stan Brumby   Stan Brumby was born and grew up in Halls Creek during the 1930’s. He then worked as a stockman for most of his life on many of the main stations across the Kinberly and northern Territory – Legune, Newry, Rosewood, Argyle, Auvergne, Bradshaw and Victoria River Downs.   Stan was a highly respected Jaru Elder and known teacher of his language and culture. He began sharing his cultural knowledge through art during the 1990’s. From his grandfather he inherited custodial ownership of the Wolf creek Crater area south of Halls Creek. This area features prominently in many of...

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The Story of Mother Earth – Uncle Pete

The Story of Mother Earth – Uncle Pete

The Story of Mother Earth. Artist: Uncle Pete The style of artwork used in retelling of this story comes from our mountain, Gunda Booka, on the road between Bourke and Cobar, NSW.  Our people have been using this style of artwork on cave walls since the beginning of time. The hand stencils are signatures we leave on the cave walls to let others know that we’ve travelled through on our way to ceremonies. The colours, too, have their own significance. The red ochre  is used by men who’ve attended ceremonies. For my people, the red ochre represents the blood of God, Mooka. Women who’ve attended...

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Understanding Desert Art.

Desert art (also known as dot painting) is recognised internationally as an integral part of Aboriginal Art.  The artists are from central and western desert, approx 230km radius of Alice Springs. Click Here To View Other Aboriginal Artwork   Though visually beautiful, the paintings have a deeper purpose. Using an aerial view and iconography, they are part of the Dreaming stories related to the artist’s country and the cultural teachings passed down from ancestral spirits. Traditionally the paintings were created for Ceremonies. Ceremonies are like schools for Aboriginal people....

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Acclaimed Aboriginal artist, Greg Weatherby chooses Waradah as a stockist.

  Greg Weatherby’s father is a Yuin man from Maruya in NSW’s South Coast, and his mother was an English woman. Greg’s talents as an artist became apparent from an early age, whilst living in a boy’s home with his four brothers. At the time, the nun’s forced him to paint religious pictures. Upon leaving, Greg became interested in learning about his Aboriginal heritage. Travelling his father’s country, he attended ceremonies, learnt the ways of his ancestors, and collected dreamtime stories, which he transcribed into his paintings. Today, Greg is a...

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