Media

A range of images and videos from the centre

Introducing Banggarai – The Movie

Introducing Banggarai – The Movie

For you to understand my people, to understand our culture, the connection between our people and the land, I need to take you back, way back. Back long, long time ago. A long time before colonisation. Back to the beginning.   Filmed in the Blue Mountains, produced by Waradah, and featured exclusively at our centre, Bangarrai is the story of a young Aboriginal man coming of age at a pivital time in Australia’s history. Join us at Waradah theatre and travel back in time. Learn the customs, protocols, and traditions of Australian Aboriginal. Call the centre on 02 4782 1979 or via...

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Acclaimed Aboriginal artist, Greg Weatherby chooses Waradah as a stockist.

  Greg Weatherby’s father is a Yuin man from Maruya in NSW’s South Coast, and his mother was an English woman. Greg’s talents as an artist became apparent from an early age, whilst living in a boy’s home with his four brothers. At the time, the nun’s forced him to paint religious pictures. Upon leaving, Greg became interested in learning about his Aboriginal heritage. Travelling his father’s country, he attended ceremonies, learnt the ways of his ancestors, and collected dreamtime stories, which he transcribed into his paintings. Today, Greg is a...

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What is a Coolamon?

Coolamon is a bowl (a curved wooden tray) which has been used by many Aboriginal tribes especially the women as a gathering tool. Coolemon is primarily used as a dish to hold food, in the case of deep Coolamon, it can also be used as water carrier or even a rocker for putting babies to sleep.   Coolamon can be an oval cut-out of bark of some trees or a chunk of trunk or root of some trees that is scooped out by Aboriginal men or women. Box tree, Gidgee tree (some Acacia species), red gum tree etc. are often amongst the timbers used in coolamons. Waradah’s gallery sources authentic...

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Explore the Unique Features of Aboriginal Culture at Waradah.

Explore the Unique Features of Aboriginal Culture at Waradah.

Australian Aborigines have a long tradition of storey telling. In the absence of a written language, important cultural and sacred knowledge is passed down by Elders through Dreaming stories, song, dance and art. The Dreaming (or Dreamtime) incorporates the past, present and future. Each Aboriginal person is intricately connected to Country through their ancestral Dreamings and totems (sacred emblems chosen by ancestral beings which symbolise the group). Australian Aborigines learn the Dreaming Stories through travel, song, ritual and art.     We at Waradah Aboriginal Centre, have...

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The Education Room Gets a Facelift

Over the past few weeks, Waradah Aboriginal Centre has undertaken refurbishments to it’s Education Room, to the value of $10,000. These include: Five 42 inch screens featuring videos of Kevin Rudd’s apology, interviews with Elders and Indigenous artists painting on canvas. Audio visual guides replacing plaques explaining the various Aboriginal tools and weapons. The Australian, Aboriginal and Torres Island flags added to the garden wall. Additional Garden Wall and aged wood framing around information posters. The changes are designed to make the room both visually more appealing and...

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Waradah Gets a Face-lift.

Waradah Gets a Face-lift.

Saturday, March 4th, 2017 Well maybe not the full nip and tuck but a touch-up all the same. Gone is the plastic sign, replaced by a far more impressive 3d wooden lettering. Gone also is the flat screen tv, allowing for cleaner lines and a more rustic, earthy look.       The flat screen television with Waradah’s promotional video has moved to behind the counter. The Australian ferns and fauna, and the rustic panels framing the screen , gives visitors the impression of bringing the Australian bush inside.   Visitors will also notice a new opal counter. Since the late...

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