Posts Tagged "Aboriginal Lore"

Feature Artist: Walala Tjapaltjarri

Walala Tjapaltjarri and his family group were amongst the last nomadic desert dwellers to join their kinsmen in the small settlements that had grown around the periphery of their homelands. The family – four brothers, three sisters and two mothers – had lived a subsistence life, isolated from their relatives who had left their desert homelands twenty years earlier. Click Here for More Indigenous Art After making contact with their relatives, the Pintupi nine as they became known, were invited to live at Kiwirrkura, where most of them still reside. During this time, Walala and his...

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Feature Artist: Linda Syddick

Feature Artist: Linda Syddick

Linda Yunkata Syddick Napaltjarri (born c. 1937) is a Pintupi– and Pitjantjatjara– speaking Indigenous artist from Australia’s Western Desert region. Her father was killed by a revenge spearing party in accordance with customary Law when Linda was about eighteen months old; her mother later married Shorty Lungkarta Tjungarrayi, an artist whose work was a significant influence on Linda’s painting. Until the age of nine, Linda was raised in the traditional nomadic fashion, after which her family walked out of the desert to settle at the Lutheran Mission at Haasts Bluff...

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The Story of Mother Earth – Uncle Pete

The Story of Mother Earth – Uncle Pete

The Story of Mother Earth. Artist: Uncle Pete The style of artwork used in retelling of this story comes from our mountain, Gunda Booka, on the road between Bourke and Cobar, NSW.  Our people have been using this style of artwork on cave walls since the beginning of time. The hand stencils are signatures we leave on the cave walls to let others know that we’ve travelled through on our way to ceremonies. The colours, too, have their own significance. The red ochre  is used by men who’ve attended ceremonies. For my people, the red ochre represents the blood of God, Mooka. Women who’ve attended...

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Acknowledgement Of Country & Welcome to Country

Protocols for welcoming visitors to country have been a part of Aboriginal culture for thousands of years. Despite the absence of fences or visible borders, Aboriginal groups had clear boundaries separating their countries. Permission was needed by travellers when crossing into another group’s country – similar to obtaining a visa. When permission was granted, the hosting group would welcome the visitors, offering them safe passage.     An acknowledgement of country is a protocol performed preceding an official meeting or formal activity. It acknowledges the Aboriginal...

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Three Core Aboriginal Lore: Love, Respect and Humility.

“Aboriginal spirituality is defined as at the core of Aboriginal being, their very identity. It gives meaning to all aspects of life including relationships with one another and the environment. All objects are living and share the same soul and spirit as Aboriginals. There is a kinship with the environment. Aboriginal spirituality can be expressed visually, musically and ceremonially.” (Grant, E.K. 2004) The traditional concepts of love, respect and humility form the foundation of the Aboriginal way of life. They are built around acknowledging everything in nature as sacred....

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