Posts Tagged "Aborigines"

Feature Artist: Violet Petyarre

Feature Artist: Violet Petyarre

Violet Petyarre’s artistic endeavours commenced in 1977 with Batik tie-dying and woodblock printing techniques, in which her Dreaming references were burnt into wood with hot wire and then ‘stamped’ onto fabric. Colours were then applied and these bright fabric panels were then sewn into garments that were welcomed by the Utopia women. With other Utopia women, Violet Petyarre’s first works-on-canvas evolved through a special local project entitled ‘Utopia Women’s Paintings – A Summer Project 1988-1989’ (The Holmes a’ Court Collection). This project engendered a new direction of artistic...

Read More

Feature Artist: Walala Tjapaltjarri

Walala Tjapaltjarri and his family group were amongst the last nomadic desert dwellers to join their kinsmen in the small settlements that had grown around the periphery of their homelands. The family – four brothers, three sisters and two mothers – had lived a subsistence life, isolated from their relatives who had left their desert homelands twenty years earlier. Click Here for More Indigenous Art After making contact with their relatives, the Pintupi nine as they became known, were invited to live at Kiwirrkura, where most of them still reside. During this time, Walala and his...

Read More

What is a Coolamon?

Coolamon is a bowl (a curved wooden tray) which has been used by many Aboriginal tribes especially the women as a gathering tool. Coolemon is primarily used as a dish to hold food, in the case of deep Coolamon, it can also be used as water carrier or even a rocker for putting babies to sleep.   Coolamon can be an oval cut-out of bark of some trees or a chunk of trunk or root of some trees that is scooped out by Aboriginal men or women. Box tree, Gidgee tree (some Acacia species), red gum tree etc. are often amongst the timbers used in coolamons. Waradah’s gallery sources authentic...

Read More

Explore the Unique Features of Aboriginal Culture at Waradah.

Explore the Unique Features of Aboriginal Culture at Waradah.

Australian Aborigines have a long tradition of storey telling. In the absence of a written language, important cultural and sacred knowledge is passed down by Elders through Dreaming stories, song, dance and art. The Dreaming (or Dreamtime) incorporates the past, present and future. Each Aboriginal person is intricately connected to Country through their ancestral Dreamings and totems (sacred emblems chosen by ancestral beings which symbolise the group). Australian Aborigines learn the Dreaming Stories through travel, song, ritual and art.     We at Waradah Australian Centre, have...

Read More