Posts Tagged "Australian Aboriginal Culture"

Feature Artist: Linda Syddick

Feature Artist: Linda Syddick

Linda Yunkata Syddick Napaltjarri (born c. 1937) is a Pintupi– and Pitjantjatjara– speaking Indigenous artist from Australia’s Western Desert region. Her father was killed by a revenge spearing party in accordance with customary Law when Linda was about eighteen months old; her mother later married Shorty Lungkarta Tjungarrayi, an artist whose work was a significant influence on Linda’s painting. Until the age of nine, Linda was raised in the traditional nomadic fashion, after which her family walked out of the desert to settle at the Lutheran Mission at Haasts Bluff...

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Feature Artist – Barbara Reid

Feature Artist – Barbara Reid

Barbara Reid Napangardi was born in 1962 near Tjukurla, Western Australia. She is the daughter of famous Australian National Gallery Artist, Ningura Napurulla and paints important women’s dreamings. Her paintings vividly depict a ceremonial site near Tjukurla where she was born and raised. Barbara’s use of bright colours is one of her trademarks coupled with thickly layered paint, typical of the Kintore region. Her style is an excellent example of the multivalent nature of Aboriginal paintings, that is, that the designs used in the paintings often have a number of interrelated symbolic...

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Feature Artist: Stan Brumby

  Stan Brumby   Stan Brumby was born and grew up in Halls Creek during the 1930’s. He then worked as a stockman for most of his life on many of the main stations across the Kinberly and northern Territory – Legune, Newry, Rosewood, Argyle, Auvergne, Bradshaw and Victoria River Downs.   Stan was a highly respected Jaru Elder and known teacher of his language and culture. He began sharing his cultural knowledge through art during the 1990’s. From his grandfather he inherited custodial ownership of the Wolf creek Crater area south of Halls Creek. This area features prominently in many of...

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The Story of Mother Earth – Uncle Pete

The Story of Mother Earth – Uncle Pete

The Story of Mother Earth. Artist: Uncle Pete The style of artwork used in retelling of this story comes from our mountain, Gunda Booka, on the road between Bourke and Cobar, NSW.  Our people have been using this style of artwork on cave walls since the beginning of time. The hand stencils are signatures we leave on the cave walls to let others know that we’ve travelled through on our way to ceremonies. The colours, too, have their own significance. The red ochre  is used by men who’ve attended ceremonies. For my people, the red ochre represents the blood of God, Mooka. Women who’ve attended...

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Traditional Aboriginal Hunting Tool: The Boomerang

Traditional Aboriginal Hunting Tool: The Boomerang

  Aboriginal people have an intimate understanding of their natural environment – as evident in their stories, songs, dances, and artwork. Though Aboriginal people’s tools vary by group and location, they share common characteristics such as knives, scrapers, ax-heads, spears, various vessels for eating and drinking, and digging sticks. In this post, we’ll be focusing on the most famous Aboriginal hunting tool: the boomerang. There are two types of boomerangs: The Returning Boomerang.   Arguably, the most iconic Aboriginal implement, the returning boomerang is...

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