Posts Tagged "katoomba"

Feature Artist: Linda Syddick

Feature Artist: Linda Syddick

Linda Yunkata Syddick Napaltjarri (born c. 1937) is a Pintupi– and Pitjantjatjara– speaking Indigenous artist from Australia’s Western Desert region. Her father was killed by a revenge spearing party in accordance with customary Law when Linda was about eighteen months old; her mother later married Shorty Lungkarta Tjungarrayi, an artist whose work was a significant influence on Linda’s painting. Until the age of nine, Linda was raised in the traditional nomadic fashion, after which her family walked out of the desert to settle at the Lutheran Mission at Haasts Bluff...

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Introducing Banggarai – The Movie

Introducing Banggarai – The Movie

For you to understand my people, to understand our culture, the connection between our people and the land, I need to take you back, way back. Back long, long time ago. A long time before colonisation. Back to the beginning. Filmed in the Blue Mountains, produced by Waradah, and featured exclusively at Waradah’s custom-built theatre, Bangarrai is the story of a young Aboriginal man coming of age at a pivotal time in Australia’s history.   Join us at Waradah theatre and travel back in time. Learn the customs, protocols, and traditions of Australian Aboriginal. Call the...

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What is a Coolamon?

Coolamon is a bowl (a curved wooden tray) which has been used by many Aboriginal tribes especially the women as a gathering tool. Coolemon is primarily used as a dish to hold food, in the case of deep Coolamon, it can also be used as water carrier or even a rocker for putting babies to sleep.   Coolamon can be an oval cut-out of bark of some trees or a chunk of trunk or root of some trees that is scooped out by Aboriginal men or women. Box tree, Gidgee tree (some Acacia species), red gum tree etc. are often amongst the timbers used in coolamons. Waradah’s gallery sources authentic...

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Explore the Unique Features of Aboriginal Culture at Waradah.

Explore the Unique Features of Aboriginal Culture at Waradah.

Australian Aborigines have a long tradition of storey telling. In the absence of a written language, important cultural and sacred knowledge is passed down by Elders through Dreaming stories, song, dance and art. The Dreaming (or Dreamtime) incorporates the past, present and future. Each Aboriginal person is intricately connected to Country through their ancestral Dreamings and totems (sacred emblems chosen by ancestral beings which symbolise the group). Australian Aborigines learn the Dreaming Stories through travel, song, ritual and art.     We at Waradah Australian Centre, have...

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Reconciliation Week 2017

Reconciliation Week 2017

National Reconciliation Week runs from 27 May – 3 June. These dates mark two milestones in Australia’s reconciliation journey: the 1967 referendum and the historic 1992 Mabo decision, respectively. It is a significant week in Australian life for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people to get together and learn more about each other. In 1967, the Australians voted overwhelmingly to amend the constitution to include Aboriginal people in the census and allow the Commonwealth to create laws for them. In 1992, Eddie Mabo successfully challenged the Australian legal system and fought for recognition...

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