Posts Tagged "three sisters"

Mountain Devils at Waradah

Mountain Devils at Waradah

Who remembers the Mountain Devils? Did you know Mountain Devils have had a special relationship with Echo Point? From early as the 1930’s, enterprising Blue Mountains residents harvested the seed-head from the native shrub, Lambertia formosa (from the same family of Banksia and Waratah with spiky pink flowers) to fashion little devil dolls for tourists. Though hugely popular in the 1940’s-70’s, by the 1980’s the dolls started disappearing from the Blue Mountains shops and kiosks. Growing up in the Blue Mountains, Sarah Michell had fond memories of the Mountain Devils and in...

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Feature Artist: Walala Tjapaltjarri

Walala Tjapaltjarri and his family group were amongst the last nomadic desert dwellers to join their kinsmen in the small settlements that had grown around the periphery of their homelands. The family – four brothers, three sisters and two mothers – had lived a subsistence life, isolated from their relatives who had left their desert homelands twenty years earlier. Click Here for More Indigenous Art After making contact with their relatives, the Pintupi nine as they became known, were invited to live at Kiwirrkura, where most of them still reside. During this time, Walala and his...

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Feature Artist: Nellie Nakamarra Marks

Feature Artist: Nellie Nakamarra Marks

Nellie belongs to the Pintubi clan from the Kintore area in Central Australia. She was taught to paint by many of the founders of the desert art movement, includingOld Mick Namarrari, Uta Uta, Pinta Pinta and her father, the great master Turkey Tolson Tjupurrula. Nellie has learned the Dreamings of her family ever since she was a small child. Her subjects are primarily Lightning dreaming, Women’s stories and Women’s Tingari from her father’s and her grandfather’s country which lies to the east of Kintore in the Northern Territory. Women’s Dreaming stories depicts her family as they move...

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Explore the Unique Features of Aboriginal Culture at Waradah.

Explore the Unique Features of Aboriginal Culture at Waradah.

Australian Aborigines have a long tradition of storey telling. In the absence of a written language, important cultural and sacred knowledge is passed down by Elders through Dreaming stories, song, dance and art. The Dreaming (or Dreamtime) incorporates the past, present and future. Each Aboriginal person is intricately connected to Country through their ancestral Dreamings and totems (sacred emblems chosen by ancestral beings which symbolise the group). Australian Aborigines learn the Dreaming Stories through travel, song, ritual and art.     We at Waradah Aboriginal Centre, have...

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School Holiday Program

School Holiday Program

Children Naturally Love Art. And why shouldn’t they. It’s fun. It’s social. And it promotes learning through play and creativity. Over the years, researchers have identified a multitude of other benefits that art has on children’s development. These include: It provides an avenue for kids to express themselves freely. Art encourages kids to think creatively, with an open mind; It helps kids learn to observe and describe, analyse and interpret; It allows an avenue for kids to express their feelings; It promotes problem-solving and critical-thinking skills. Introduces...

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